Halloween Day Dilemma

The spookiest thing is that the celebratory day could be moved.

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Halloween Day Dilemma

Ethan Webster, Reporter

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Halloween is one of the most celebrated holidays in the United States today. Children dress up in all sorts of costumes and skeletons and ghouls decorate the landscape. Demons, spiders, pumpkins, witches, and ghosts come out for musical and film appearances and the fright begins. However there is a problem. Halloween is traditionally celebrated always on the 31st of October, which doesn’t always fall on the most opportune days of the week: Friday and Saturday. Since Halloween derives from Christian roots, most schools do not offer the day off, which makes the tradition of trick-or-treating, especially for little kids, difficult to do with school the next day. Last year, a petition was launched by the non-profit Halloween and Costumes association to move the holiday to the last Saturday of October. 

The petition started on Change.org, and currently has thousands of signatures on it. In fact, the petition gains more and more as time passes, and now has a total of over 155 thousand signatures. The petition itself began a little over a year ago, but has picked up a lot of attention as it is nearing its goal of 200,000 total signatures. The petition has been presented to President Donald Trump but it is unclear what he or his administration will do about it. Halloween itself is not a federal holiday, so how the government goes about it will be interesting. 

Parents and activists argue that not only would it be better for kids going to school, as it would allow them to actually enjoy the holiday and its traditions without worrying about school the following day, but it will also help out working Americans. Each year, about 3,800 school children in America get injuries from Halloween each year. If the holiday were to be moved, it would be safer for kids and working adults would not have to worry about handing out candy and strangers knocking on there door on a weeknight when work needs to get done and bedtimes are earlier. The stress of preparing the home could be passed on to the weekend when more time is readily available to handle cleaning, decorating, and handing out candy without interfering with the majority of work and sleep schedules. In addition, companies like Party City have partnered with the movement, arguing that it only adds an extra day of festivities for kids, which in turn generates more profit for many Halloween brands and adding a stimulus to the economy and boosts to local economies as well. 

Moving the holiday does have many benefits, not only making the holiday safer for kids but easier for adults as well. It adds more money into the Halloween industry and boosts economies this time of year. Many Americans are on board with the movement, and there is not a whole lot of support against it, despite its historical meaning. It’s time for you to make a decision for yourself, are you on board?